Clinical

Gensco’s Astero hydrogel alleviates diabetic foot ulcers

Gensco’s Astero hydrogel alleviates diabetic foot ulcers

As seen in Chain Drug Review’s Diabetes Care Report.
Approximately 15% of people with diabetes suffer from foot ulcers, and treating them properly can be challenging for the patient. However, failure to do so, with resulting infection, carries the danger of eventual amputation.

A Review and Case Study of Astero®  (Lidocaine HCl 4%), a New Prescription Hydrogel for Painful Wounds

A Review and Case Study of Astero® (Lidocaine HCl 4%), a New Prescription Hydrogel for Painful Wounds

By Marc A. Brenner, DPM | Podiatry Management, Clinical Innovations, The Diabetic Foot.
Wound pain has numerous, often interlinked, causes that may relate to the initial injury, the inflammatory response or infection. Pain may also result from interventions, such as dressing removal, cleansing, debridement, compression therapy, or topical treatments. Pain as a result of trauma, particularly during the dressing change procedure, has been described by patients as the worst part of dealing with a wound.1

MDose v Tube Study

MDose v Tube Study

MDose™ Technology Background It has been shown that convenience, ease of dispensing and favorable tolerability are key characteristics that may increase patient compliance with topical dermatologic therapy.[1],[2],[3] Additionally, the quantity of drug utilized with...
ColciGel®: A Superior Alternative for Acute Gout Flares

ColciGel®: A Superior Alternative for Acute Gout Flares

By Gary E. Myerson, MD, Marc Alan Brenner, DPM, Robert L. Wilbur, Pharm.D., CPh | Director, Medical Affairs
A new agent, ColciGel®, has recently emerged for the treatment of acute flares of gout. ColciGel is a transdermal gel preparation of Colchicinum (colchicine in its homeopathic state) that is applied topically. ColciGel contains Colchicinum 4X in a proprietary Organogel that is applied directly to the site of acute flares.

Pharmacoeconomics of ColciGel for the Treatment of Acute Gout Flares

Pharmacoeconomics of ColciGel for the Treatment of Acute Gout Flares

By Gary E. Myerson, MD
Oral Colchicine was effective in only 38% of patients treated for acute flares.1 It is associated with poor tolerability due to a high-rate of gastrointestinal effects; typically nausea, vomiting, abdominal cramps and diarrhea. Less common but more significant is a strong potential for drug-drug interactions with oral colchicine as it is metabolized and transported by cytochrome P450-3A4 and P-glycoprotein, two systems used by many other drugs.2 Fatalities have occurred from these drug-drug interactions with colchicine.3 4